50 Facts about Hillary's Dead Lover Vince Foster that will convince you he was murdered.

Hillary Clinton’s lover, lawyer, and best friend was found dead by gunshot near D.C in 1993. White House Counsel Vince Foster was the highest government official with a suspicious death since JFK.

Among the many very questionable items in the alleged suicide case are these 50 documented facts:

1

The lead prosecutor suggested Foster’s “corpse was staged with the revolver” by Park Police officers. [1]
 

This famous picture was shown on every news network.

This famous picture was shown on every news network.

2

Hillary said under oath that a month before Foster’s death, she spoke to him only one time, casually, over the phone. But a staffer testified Hillary was in Foster’s office four times. That FBI testimony was hidden for several years. [2]
 

3

According to his FBI report, when the first paramedic, Todd Hall, approached Foster’s body at Fort Marcy Park, he saw men running away from the scene into the woods. [3]
 

4

The lead prosecutor, Miguel Rodriguez, resigned after much pressure from the Office of Independent Counsel: “They told me, to quote, this is a quote: ‘Back off.’ It was either ‘back off’ or ‘back down.’ They used both.” [4]
 

Miguel Rodriguez

Miguel Rodriguez

5

The first officer to take photos, Franz Ferstl, said his seven polaroids were snatched up by a superior at the body scene. They were never seen again. Detective John Rolla took a number of photos that were lost. “I mean, I had them in the office that night, I did reports, and I don’t know what happened,” he testified in Senate Depositions. “I put them in a jacket, I don’t know.” [5]
 

6

“It was an accepted fact that Hillary and Vince were sleeping with other,” said Dr. Michael Galster, whose wife Vali was a close friend of Hillary’s. The couple mixed in the Clinton’s social circles. “Hillary and Vince’s love affair was an open secret.” [6]
 

Buy the book that documents these 50 facts and hundreds more. 

Buy the book that documents these 50 facts and hundreds more. 

7

The FBI did not bother to identify the one fingerprint found on the underside of the gun at the death scene. It wasn’t Foster’s. [7]

8

The lead prosecutor said the rest of the gun was “clean or wiped.” [8]
 

Official FBI photo of gun allegedly found at death scene.

Official FBI photo of gun allegedly found at death scene.

9

Hillary and Vince’s getaways during work hours at the Rose Law Firm included lunch while watching lingerie shows. Hillary even hired a belly dancer for Vince on his birthday. [9]
 

10

State Troopers Larry Patterson and Roger Perry related how Vince would show up at the Governor’s mansion in the evening like clockwork whenever Bill Clinton traveled. They also escorted Hillary and Vince to a remote cabin out in the woods. [10]

11

“Everybody knew about Hillary and Vince,” said Jim McDougal, the man who persuaded the Clintons to buy property called Whitewater. [11]
 

Jim McDougal

Jim McDougal

12

Trooper L. D. Brown was Bill Clinton’s closest bodyguard. “Hillary and Vince were deeply in love,” said Brown. “I saw them locked in each other’s arms, deep kissing, nuzzling.” On a walk he saw them “running tongues down each other’s throats.” [12]
 

L. D. Brown with Gov. Bill Clinton

L. D. Brown with Gov. Bill Clinton

13

L. D. Brown says Hillary gave him this advice: “There are some things you have to get outside your marriage that you can’t get in it.” The trooper has no doubt about Vince and Hillary’s affair. “I was there. I saw it.” [13]

14

Vince Foster kept a list for Hillary of all the women her husband Bill Clinton was sleeping with, and Foster helped her hire private detectives, both to monitor the activities and warn the women if they talked. [14]
 

15

Bill’s mistress Dolly Kyle Browning said she agreed to keep her mouth shut, but later admitted someone affiliated with the Clinton campaign warned her to be silent or they would “destroy you.” [15]
 

Dolly Kyle Browning

Dolly Kyle Browning

16

Former Miss America Elizabeth Ward Gracen agreed to make a statement that rumors of her affair with Bill Clinton were false. After her room was ransacked she appeared on “Dateline” and admitted to “a single sexual encounter.” [16]
 

Elizabeth Ward Gracen

Elizabeth Ward Gracen

17

Another former Miss America, Sally Perdue, was regularly visited by Clinton, according to state troopers. Her interview on the Sally Jesse Rafael Show never aired. Later, a man asked to meet with her at a restaurant. “He couldn’t guarantee what might happen to my pretty legs,” she said. [17]
 

Sally Perdue

Sally Perdue

18

Bill Clinton is on tape telling his lover Gennifer Flowers, “If everyone is on record denying it, no problem.” When she was about to testify, her apartment was ransacked. Her neighbor, who had secretly videotaped the activity outside her front door, was beaten severely and several bones broken. Someone called her mother. Your daughter would be “better off dead,” he told her. [18]
 

Gennifer Flowers

Gennifer Flowers

19

Hillary’s chief of staff Betsy Wright, who coined the term “Bimbo eruptions,” admitted to the Washington Post that the Clinton campaign had hired private investigators “to figure out where and why these charges [against Bill] are being leveled.” [19]
 

Betsy Wright

Betsy Wright

20

When Christy Zercher, the flight attendant on Clinton’s jet Longhorn One started talking to the Washington Post, her house was burglarized but no jewelry taken. She stopped talking to the press. [20]

21

After Linda Tripp told the press about Kathleen Willey being sexually accosted by Clinton in the oval office, Willey’s house was burglarized. Her cat disappeared and her tires were slashed. A man walked by the house, mentioned the cat and tires, and asked if she got the message. [21]
 

Bill with Kathleen Willey

Bill with Kathleen Willey

22

The lead prosecutor for the Starr Investigation of Foster’s death said he was “forced out of this job.” [22] He gave several reasons for concluding that there was certainly “not overwhelming evidence” for suicide:

23

The first witness saw no gun, but rather testified that Foster’s hands were “palms up.” [23]

24

Recollections of depression in Foster by certain family and colleagues only emerged after the fact, and nothing in the record before Foster’s death indicates a problem. [24]

25

One of Foster’s best longtime friends, who called him the morning of his death, sensed nothing unusual: “He was the same Vince I’d always known,” said Gordan Rather. [25]

26

Foster’s last words to his secretary upon leaving the office were: “I’ll be back.” [26]
 

Linda Tripp was an assistant in Foster's office.

Linda Tripp was an assistant in Foster's office.

27

Four prints on the car alleged to be Foster’s were never identified. [27]

28

At least four Park Police officers happened to arrive early on the scene “by coincidence.” [28]

29

Foliage behind Foster’s body in the pictures differed. [29]

30

Fort Marcy Park had private roads and a private parking lot in the other direction from the corpse. The Park Police officers knew about these secret roads but never discussed them. [30]
 

Park Police testify at hearings.

Park Police testify at hearings.

31

Foster’s semen was found on his shorts, and the lead prosecutor noted that semen is not released upon a fatal bullet to the head. [31]

32

The official report said “no one observed anything unusual,” even though two witnesses saw a blonde man “large, bare-chested, unkempt” at the crime scene parking lot who walked into the woods where Foster's body was found. [32]

33

A first witness on the scene, Patrick Knowlton, stopped to relieve himself and saw a Hispanic or Middle-Eastern man who stared menacingly at him with a “get the hell out of here” kind of look. [33]
 

Composite drawing of menacing man.

Composite drawing of menacing man.

34

Knowlton told his story to Park Police but little interest was taken. The Fiske Report mentioned him anonymously but never mentioned the sinister man. [34]
 

Patrick Knowlton

Patrick Knowlton

35

When the London Telegraph published Knowlton’s story a year after the death, a grand jury that day subpoenad him to testify. [35]
 

London Telegraph's Ambrose Evan Pritchard.

London Telegraph's Ambrose Evan Pritchard.

36

The FBI’s report said Knowlton would not be able to identify the sinister man, but Knowlton told them specifically that he could pick the man out of a line-up. [36]

37

The day before Knowlton testified, a man smashed the head and tail lights of his restored Peugot 504 with a crowbar. He was later arrested and identified as Jeffrey Bickett, a man who worked with the FBI and Pentagon and enjoyed special clearance with the goverment, higher than Top Secret. [37]
 

Knowlton's interrogator - FBI Agent Larry Monroe

Knowlton's interrogator - FBI Agent Larry Monroe

38

The official report said it was a revolver, but a first paramedic on the scene, Richard Arthur, an ex-army man, was “100 percent sure” it wasn’t a revolver. Perhaps a nine millimeter pistol,” he said. “Square, not round like a revolver.” [38]

39

Arthur explained on record why many items were left unreported: “Lt. Bianchi told me from orders higher up that I’m not allowed to talk to anybody about this if I value my job.” [39]
 

Grand jury witnesses were routinely intimidated. 

Grand jury witnesses were routinely intimidated. 

40

The official report describes a head wound, but of the 26 people at the death scene, no one noticed a mouth wound or an exit wound in the skull. But several saw a neck wound, just what you might expect if an assassin was pressing a gun up against a taller man like Foster. [40]

41

An exit wound appears in the Fiske Report thanks to the doctor at the Fairfax County morgue, Julian Orenstein, but he told a reporter he was surprised the Fiske Report implied an exit wound. “I never saw one directly,” he said. [41]
 

Vince Foster

Vince Foster

42

Detective John Rolla: "I probed his head and there was no big hole there.” [42]

43

The only doctor to examine Foster’s head told a senate committee he took no x-rays, even though his report said he did, and the Park Police mentioned his x-ray findings. “I have no explanation,” Dr. James Beyer told the senators. [43]
 

44

Beyer also ruled Tommy Burkett’s death a suicide, who was found like Foster with a revolver in his hand, no sign of struggle. He said he took no x-rays. His parents learned their son was a DEA informant. They ordered a second autopsy which found many wounds from a struggle. “Beyer is nothing but a stooge for the FBI,” they wrote in an open letter. [44]

45

Beyer also ruled Timothy Easley’s death a suicide. He had been stabbed in the chest. But photos showed cuts on the back of his hands, classic defense wounds. Later, his girlfriend confessed to murdering him. [45]

46

The official photographer for the scene was Park Police technician Pete Simonello. His entire roll of 35 mm photos was declared “underexposed” by the FBI. He was surprised. His camera has never failed before or since. Even more strange, medic Arthur was shown a blow up of one of Simonello’s photos during his FBI interview. “They appeared to be pretty clear,” he said. They even showed a few of them to Simonello himself who said they “looked good to me. They didn’t look underexposed.” [46]
 

Pete Simonella

Pete Simonella

47

The first official to find the body was Park Police Officer Kevin Fornshill. The park wasn’t part of his responsibility; his job was to guard the entrance to the CIA, a stone’s throw from Fort Marcy Park. He was not interviewed for a year.

Senator:  Did any of the detectives on the scene come and talk to you?Fornshill: No...
Senator:  None of these guys ever talked to you about the crime scene?Fornshill: No, not that I know of. [47]

48

When paramedic Todd Hall told Fornshill he saw men running away, Fornshill did not respond. “There’s someone down there!” Hall said. [48]
 

Fort Marcy Park

Fort Marcy Park

49

As Ferstl was snapping pictures, Sgt. Bob Edwards arrived and took charge of the scene. The other Park Police officers were not familiar with him. “I didn’t know who this guy was. Nobody [knew] who this guy was,” said Detective Rolla. [49]

50

Edwards told Fornshill to go back and guard the CIA entrance. He then took Ferstl’s seven polaroids and ordered him to return to the parking lot. Sgt. Bob Edwards was never mentioned by the FBI or Robert Fiske. The Senate never took his deposition. The one and only interview of the first officer in command at Vince Foster’s death scene was conducted years later by the Starr Investigation. It remains secret. [50]
 

Ken Starr's report for the Office of Independent Counsel is riddled with contradictions and marred by the forced resignation of its lead prosecutor, Miguel Rodriguez.

Ken Starr's report for the Office of Independent Counsel is riddled with contradictions and marred by the forced resignation of its lead prosecutor, Miguel Rodriguez.

 

Read the book with all these facts and hundreds more: Why did Ken Starr compromise? What happened to the women Hillary hired investigators to intimidate? Why was Vince Foster killed? Read about all this and more by purchasing Hillary and Vince: A story of love, death, and cover-up

“Dean Arnold has a unique way of capturing the essence of an issue and communicating it through his clear but compelling style of writing.”
— U.S. Senator Bob Corker, Chairman, Foreign Relations Committee

[1] Miguel Rodriguez Memo, Dec. 9, 1994, “Meeting of Nov. 29, 1994 Concerning Foster Death Matter and Supplemental Investigation Prior to Grand Jury.” National Archives document, 102-506 (JFK Act), released Nov. 27, 2009. p. 22.

[2] “Hillary Clinton in Vincent Foster’s office approximately four times . . .”

FBI 302 report of Thomas Castleton, May 3, 1994. Cited in Hugh Turley and Mark Wright, “Former White House Aide Contradicts Hillary,” Unpublished article, Sept. 2007. “. . . hidden for several years . . .” Author’s interview with Hugh Turley.

[3] “he saw men running away . . .”

FBI 302 report of Todd Hall, March 18, 1994. Cited in Ambrose Evans-Pritchard, The Secret Life of Bill Clinton (Regnery Publishing, 1997), p. 125.

Miguel Rodriguez Memo, Dec. 9, 1994, “Meeting of Nov. 29, 1994 Concerning Foster Death Matter and Supplemental Investigation Prior to Grand Jury.” National Archives document, 102-506 (JFK Act), released Nov. 27, 2009. p. 17.

[4] “Death of Vince Foster: Parts 1- 4,” Accuracy in Media tape transcription of phone calls with Miguel Rodriguez, Oct. 16, 2004. The phone calls themselves are also available on CD.

[5] “seven polaroids were snatched up . . . I mean, I had them in the office”

Exhibit 96, Report of FBI interview of Park Police Officer Franz Ferstl, May 2, 1994. Cited in Clarke, Knowlton and Turley, Failure of the Public Trust, (McCabe Publishing, 1999), p. 132.

Green Books, p. 652: Senate deposition of Detective John Rolla, July 21, 1994. Cited in Ambrose Evans-Pritchard, The Secret Life of Bill Clinton (Regnery Publishing, 1997), p. 375.

[6] “Hillary and Vince were sleeping with each other . . . an open secret . . .”

Edward Klein, The Truth about Hillary, (Sentinel, 2005), p. 21-22.

[7] “one fingerprint found on the underside of the gun.”

Green Books, p. 1903. FBI Lab Memo, May 9, 1994. Cited Ambrose Evans-Pritchard,The Secret Life of Bill Clinton (Regnery Publishing, 1997), p. 132-133.

[8] Miguel Rodriguez Memo, Dec. 9, 1994, “Meeting of Nov. 29, 1994 Concerning Foster Death Matter and Supplemental Investigation Prior to Grand Jury.” National Archives document, 102-506 (JFK Act), released Nov. 27, 2009. p. 9.

[9] “lingerie shows . . . belly dancer . . .”

Joyce Milton, The First Partner: Hillary Rodham Clinton, (Perennial, 1999), p. 92, 146.

[10] “remote cabin out in the woods . . .”

David Brock, “Living with the Clintons: Bill’s Arkansas Bodyguards Tell the Story the Press Missed,” The American Spectator, Jan. 1994.

Christopher Anderson, Bill and Hillary: The Marriage, (William Morrow, 1999).

[11] “Everybody knew about Hillary and Vince . . .”

Ibid.

[12] “running tongues down each other’s throats . . .”

Daniel Wattenberg, “Love and Hate in Arkansas,” The American Spectator, May/June 1994. Cited in Joyce Milton, The First Partner: Hillary Rodham Clinton, (Perennial, 1999), p. 147.

Christopher Anderson, Bill and Hillary: The Marriage, (William Morrow, 1999).

 

[13] “I was there. I saw it.”

NewsMax.com, Inside report, Oct. 30, 1998.

 

[14] “Vince Foster kept the list for Hillary, . . .”

Joyce Milton, The First Partner: Hillary Rodham Clinton, (Perennial, 1999), p. 212-213.

 

[15] “Dolly Kyle Browning later admitted . . .”

Joyce Milton, The First Partner: Hillary Rodham Clinton, (Perennial, 1999), p. 225, 235.

 

[16] “. . . admitted to a single sexual encounter . . .”

Joyce Milton, The First Partner: Hillary Rodham Clinton, (Perennial, 1999), p. 226-227.

 

[17] “pretty little legs . . .”

Joyce Milton, The First Partner: Hillary Rodham Clinton, (Perennial, 1999), p. 233

 

[18] “better off dead”

Sam Smith, “Arkansas Connections: A time line of the rise and fall of Clinton and friends,” (Year 1992 of Timeline), Progressive Review, 1998. Joyce Milton, The First Partner: Hillary Rodham Clinton, (Perennial, 1999), p. 218-219.

 

[19] “admitted detectives had been hired”

Dick Morris, Rewriting History, (HarperCollins, 2004), p. 201-202.

 

[20] “Christy Zircher . . .”

Joyce Milton, The First Partner: Hillary Rodham Clinton, (Perennial, 1999), p. 241-242.

 

[21] “asked if she got the message.”

Dick Morris, Rewriting History, (HarperCollins, 2004), p.

 

[22] Miguel Rodrigues letter to Kenneth W. Starr, Jan. 17, 1995. National Archives, 102-506 (JFK Act), released Dec. 16, 2009. See http://www.fbicover-up.com/ewExternalFiles/Miquel%20resignation%20ltr.pdf
 

[23] Miguel Rodriguez Memo, Dec. 9, 1994, “Meeting of Nov. 29, 1994 Concerning Foster Death Matter and Supplemental Investigation Prior to Grand Jury.” National Archives document, 102-506 (JFK Act), released Nov. 27, 2009. p. 28

[24] Miguel Rodriguez Memo, Dec. 9, 1994, “Meeting of Nov. 29, 1994 Concerning Foster Death Matter and Supplemental Investigation Prior to Grand Jury.” National Archives document, 102-506 (JFK Act), released Nov. 27, 2009. p. 7

[25] Miguel Rodriguez Memo, Dec. 9, 1994, “Meeting of Nov. 29, 1994 Concerning Foster Death Matter and Supplemental Investigation Prior to Grand Jury.” National Archives document, 102-506 (JFK Act), released Nov. 27, 2009. p.10

[26] Miguel Rodriguez Memo, Dec. 9, 1994, “Meeting of Nov. 29, 1994 Concerning Foster Death Matter and Supplemental Investigation Prior to Grand Jury.” National Archives document, 102-506 (JFK Act), released Nov. 27, 2009. p.11

 

[27] Miguel Rodriguez Memo, Dec. 9, 1994, “Meeting of Nov. 29, 1994 Concerning Foster Death Matter and Supplemental Investigation Prior to Grand Jury.” National Archives document, 102-506 (JFK Act), released Nov. 27, 2009. p. 30

 

[28] Miguel Rodriguez Memo, Dec. 9, 1994, “Meeting of Nov. 29, 1994 Concerning Foster Death Matter and Supplemental Investigation Prior to Grand Jury.” National Archives document, 102-506 (JFK Act), released Nov. 27, 2009. p. 21

 

[29] Miguel Rodriguez Memo, Dec. 9, 1994, “Meeting of Nov. 29, 1994 Concerning Foster Death Matter and Supplemental Investigation Prior to Grand Jury.” National Archives document, 102-506 (JFK Act), released Nov. 27, 2009. p. 13.

 

[30] Miguel Rodriguez Memo, Dec. 9, 1994, “Meeting of Nov. 29, 1994 Concerning Foster Death Matter and Supplemental Investigation Prior to Grand Jury.” National Archives document, 102-506 (JFK Act), released Nov. 27, 2009. p. 11.

 

[31] Miguel Rodriguez Memo, Dec. 9, 1994, “Meeting of Nov. 29, 1994 Concerning Foster Death Matter and Supplemental Investigation Prior to Grand Jury.” National Archives document, 102-506 (JFK Act), released Nov. 27, 2009. p. 30.

 

[32] “A couple enjoying a tryst . . . or observed anything unusual.”

Ambrose Evans-Pritchard, The Secret Life of Bill Clinton (Regnery Publishing, 1997), p. 155-158.

 

[33] “get the hell out of here . . .”

John Clarke, Patrick Knowlton and Hugh Turley, Failure of the Public Trust, McCabe Publishing, 1999, (See also: <www.FBI-Coverup.com>), p. 294.

 

[34] “Fiske Report . . .”

Clarke, Knowlton and Turley, Failure of the Public Trust, (McCabe Publishing, 1999), p. 201, p. 339.

 

[35] “grand jury …”

Ambrose Evans-Pritchard, The Secret Life of Bill Clinton (Regnery Publishing, 1997), p. 171.

 

[36] “he could pick the man out of a line-up”

Ambrose Evans-Pritchard, The Secret Life of Bill Clinton (Regnery Publishing, 1997), p. 158-162.

 

[37] “worked for the FBI and Pentagon”

Ambrose Evans-Pritchard, The Secret Life of Bill Clinton (Regnery Publishing, 1997), p. 163-164.

The security credential document is reprinted on p. 416.

 

[38] “it wasn’t a revolver . . . ”

Green Books, p. 2056. Cited in Ambrose Evans-Pritchard, The Secret Life of Bill Clinton (Regnery Publishing, 1997), p. 133. Exhibit 109, Handwritten notes of FBI interview with Paramedic Richard Arthur, March 16, 1994. Cited in Clarke, Knowlton and Turley, Failure of the Public Trust, (McCabe Publishing, 1999),, p. 265. Exhibit 82, Report of FBI interview with Paramedic Richard Arthur, April 29, 1994. Cited in Clarke, Knowlton and Turley, Failure of the Public Trust, (McCabe Publishing, 1999), p. 265.

 

[39] “I’m not allowed to talk …”

Green Books, p. 892, deposition of Richard Arthur, July 14, 1994. Cited in Ambrose Evans-Pritchard, The Secret Life of Bill Clinton (Regnery Publishing, 1997), p. 143.

 

[40] “of the 26 people at the death scene, . . .”

Clarke, Knowlton and Turley, Failure of the Public Trust, (McCabe Publishing, 1999), p. 152. Ambrose Evans-Pritchard, The Secret Life of Bill Clinton (Regnery Publishing, 1997), p. 140-141.

 

[41] “I never saw one directly …”

Exhibit 121, Report of FBI interview Dr. Julian Orenstein, April 14, 1994. Cited in Clarke, Knowlton and Turley, Failure of the Public Trust, (McCabe Publishing, 1999), p. 177. FBI notes, p. 287, notes on interview with Orenstein. Cited in Ambrose Evans-Pritchard, The Secret Life of Bill Clinton (Regnery Publishing, 1997), p. 146.

 

[42] “No big hole there . . .”

Exhibit 6, Deposition of Park Police Investigator John Rolla, July 21, 1994. Cited in Clarke, Knowlton and Turley, Failure of the Public Trust, (McCabe Publishing, 1999),, p. 170-171.

 

[43] I have no explanation.”

Exhibit 125, Testimony of Dr. James C. Beyer before the United States Senate Banking Committee, July 29, 1994. Cited in Clarke, Knowlton and Turley, Failure of the Public Trust, (McCabe Publishing, 1999), p. 192

 

[44] “the example of Tommy Burkett . . .”

Christopher Ruddy, The Strange Death of Vincent Foster: An Investigation, (The Free Press, 1997), p. 275-277. Ambrose Evans-Pritchard, The Secret Life of Bill Clinton(Regnery Publishing, 1997), p. 149.

 

[45] “The case of Timothy Easley . . . girlfriend confessed . . .”

Christopher Ruddy, The Strange Death of Vincent Foster, (The Free Press, 1997), p. 275-277.

[46] “looked good to me. . .”

Exhibit 104, Deposition of Park Police Identification Technician Peter Simonello, July 14, 1994. Cited in Clarke, Knowlton and Turley, Failure of the Public Trust, (McCabe Publishing, 1999)p. 147, 150-1.

 

[47] “Officer Kevin Fornshill . . . guard the entrace to the CIA . . .”

Green Books: deposition of Kevin Fornshill, July 12, 1994. Cited in Ambrose Evans-Pritchard, The Secret Life of Bill Clinton (Regnery Publishing, 1997),. 124.

Exhibit 79, Deposition of Park Police Officer Kevin Fornshill, July 12, 1994. Cited in Clarke, Knowlton and Turley, Failure of the Public Trust, (McCabe Publishing, 1999)p. 164.

 

[48] Miguel Rodriguez Memo, Dec. 9, 1994, “Meeting of Nov. 29, 1994 Concerning Foster Death Matter and Supplemental Investigation Prior to Grand Jury.” National Archives document, 102-506 (JFK Act), released Nov. 27, 2009. p. 18.

 

[49] “I didn’t know who this guy was . . .”

Exhibit 6, Deposition of Park Police Investigator John Rolla, July 21, 1994. Cited in Clarke, Knowlton and Turley, Failure of the Public Trust, (McCabe Publishing, 1999), p. 135.

 

[50] “Edwards gave directions . . . ordered him to return to the parking lot.”

See Clarke, Knowlton and Turley, Failure of the Public Trust, (McCabe Publishing, 1999)p. 90-91.

Clarke, Knowlton and Turley, Failure of the Public Trust, (McCabe Publishing, 1999)p. 132.