Brett Kavanaugh's role in covering up the death investigation of Vince Foster

BRETT KAVANAUGH'S ROLE IN COVERING UP THE DEATH INVESTIGATION OF VINCE FOSTER

Whatever else may be Brett Kavanaugh’s qualifications for Supreme Court, one of them is the ability to cover up a death investigation. 

Kavanaugh served as a prosecutor for the investigation of the 1993 death of White House Counsel Vince Foster, a close associate of Bill and Hillary Clinton. [1]  Kavanaugh was one of the prosecutors who took over when lead prosecutor Miguel Rodriguez resigned in disgust after his aggressive probe was blocked by the Office of Independent Counsel. 

“They told me, to quote, this is a quote: ‘Back off.’ It was either ‘back off’ or ‘back down.’ They used both,” Rodriguez said in taped phone recordings with Accuracy in Media president Reed Irving, who regularly appeared with Ted Koppel on ABC's Nightline to discuss the investigation headed by Ken Starr. [2]

In his official memo, Rodriguez said he believed Foster’s “corpse was staged with the revolver” by Park Police officers. [3]

 Miguel Rodriguez, the lead prosecutor forced to resign.

Miguel Rodriguez, the lead prosecutor forced to resign.

Early concern with Kavanaugh’s involvement emerged when he refused to acknowledge key witness Patrick Knowlton’s clear testimony that the car at the Foster death scene was an early 80’s brown Honda. The official report showed a picture of a late 80’s gray Honda (although the licence plate is whited out). If Foster did not drive his own car to the death scene, the official story of suicide breaks down. [4]

Irving also taped his conversations with Kavanaugh:

Kavanaugh: “The question is whether there is evidence, other than no one saw it being moved out, and, you know, it had Arkansas plates.”

Irving: “But all these witnesses saw a brown car, not a gray one . . . Maybe it wasn’t Foster’s car.”

Kavanaugh: “People were screwed up on the colors, period.” [5]

But Kavanaugh truly showed his colors for protecting the establishment when he interrogated Knowlton directly on the stand during a grand jury hearing, particularly regarding a suspicious man Knowlton saw at the crime scene. The official report claims no one suspicious was ever identified.

“Did the man talk to you?” Kavanaugh asked.

“No,” Knowlton replied.

“Did he pass you a note?”

“No.”

“Did he point a gun at you?”

“No.”

“Did he touch your genitals?”

Knowlton became visibly angry at the suggestion. 

“Are you a ‘good citizen,’ Mr. Knowlton?” Kavanaugh continued with his bitter sarcasm. “Are you a ‘good Samaritan’?” [6]

 Patrick Knowlton's testimony contradicted the official story.

Patrick Knowlton's testimony contradicted the official story.

Knowlton said it was one of the worst three hours of his life. Irving recounted the incident to the already replaced Rodriguez:

Rodriguez:  "Who asked him if he touched his genitals?"

Irving:  "Kavanaugh.

Rodriguez:  "How could Brett stoop so low? I can’t believe Brett did that. What they are trying to do is discredit him by making him out to be, you know, a homosexual cruising at the park." [7]

Rodriguez knew Knowlton had been harassed in other ways. He told Irving prosecutors also harassed him:

Rodriguez: “I was unable to call witnesses and issue subpoenas . . . I know what [they are] capable of doing. That includes throwing tantrums and throwing chairs.”

“The Independent Counsel themselves, and the FBI, beat me back, and in fact threatened me. The Park Police were never asked tough questions. I tried to ask them tough questions and they beat the hell out of me. It was just bass ackwards.” [8]

Because of the serious problems, Miguel Rodriguez took the powerful evidence he had gathered to Ken Starr himself, and explained the harassment he received from his colleagues. Starr took it under advisement but did nothing. 

 Ken Starr, author of the "Starr Report," became famous for investigating Clinton and Lewinsky rather than Foster's death.

Ken Starr, author of the "Starr Report," became famous for investigating Clinton and Lewinsky rather than Foster's death.

To document Starr’s failure to pursue the truth, Rodriguez wrote a 30 page memo to “File,” detailing the long list of facts that contradicted a suicide verdict—the problems with identifying the gun, the lack of a head wound, the missing x-rays, the neck wound identified by first responders, men seen in the woods running away from the corpse, the lack of fingerprints on the gun that had been “wiped clean” (except for one print underneath that investigators never attempted to identify), and the many lost or ruined photographs. [9]

Rodriguez also noted that the four prints on the car were never identified, that at least four Park Police officers happened to arrive early on the scene “by coincidence,” that foliage behind Foster’s body in the pictures differed, and that Fort Marcy Park had private roads and parking lots in the other direction from the corpse. The Park Police officers knew about these secret roads but never discussed them.

The first witness saw no gun, but rather testified that Foster’s hands were “palms up.” Foster’s semen was found on his shorts, and Rodriguez noted that semen is not released upon a fatal bullet to the head. 

Rodriguez also spent several pages debunking a suicide motive, noting that recollections of depression only emerged after the fact, and nothing in the record before Foster’s death indicated a problem. He quotes one of Foster’s best friends who called him the morning of his death. “He was the same Vince I’d always known,” said Gordan Rather. Foster’s last words to his secretary upon leaving the office were, “I’ll be back.”

This official 30 page document is a recounting of all the troubling evidence presented by Rodriguez in a meeting. The memo lists Kavanaugh and two others present.

 Reed Irvine, Accuracy in Media.

Reed Irvine, Accuracy in Media.

In his resignation letter, Rodriguez listed the many facts contradicting suicide. Although grand jury testimony “had been fruitful,” his superiors informed him that “all planned grand jury investigation would be cancelled.” Instead, wrote Rodriguez, “my own conduct was questioned, and I was placed under internal investigation … In effect, for raising the above questions, I was forced out of this job.” [10]

Irving asked him what happened:

Rodriguez: "I knew what the result was going to be, because I was told what the result was going to be from the get-go. That’s why I left. I don’t do investigations like that—do investigations to justify results. This whole notion, you know, of doing an honest investigation, you know, you know . . . it’s laughable.”

Who was behind the corruption?

Rodriguez: "The result is being dictated by a lot higher, um, authority than I think people really understand or appreciate, and certainly more than I ever appreciated."

Rodriguez: “Everyone makes a very big mistake when they believe that a lot of people are necessary to orchestrate some kind of—some result here. All you need to do is just have a couple of people involved. Very few people need to know anything about anything, really. All people need to know is what their job is, not why. Be a good soldier, carry out orders. When you write a report, all you have to do is make sure it’s consistent . . . consistent with the result that you ultimately want to get, which is to not embarrass your other colleagues who have made their conclusions already.” [11]

Kavanaugh was not embarrassed. More importantly, his powerful superiors were never embarrassed. He was a good soldier. A few years later, he was appointed a federal judge by George W. Bush, as was Kavanaugh's assistant John Bates, who also interrogated Knowlton on the witness stand. 

Knowlton, after years of legal action all the way to the Supreme Court, won a decision from the three-judge panel overseeing Starr, forcing him to add an Appendix of Knowlton's omitted testimony to the official Starr Report. [12]

 Newly appointed Judge Kavanaugh.

Newly appointed Judge Kavanaugh.

[1] Trooper L. D. Brown was Bill Clinton’s closest bodyguard. “Hillary and Vince were deeply in love,” said Brown. “I saw them locked in each other’s arms, deep kissing, nuzzling.” On a walk he saw them “running tongues down each other’s throats.” —Daniel Wattenberg, “Love and Hate in Arkansas,” The American Spectator, May/June 1994. Cited in Joyce Milton, The First Partner: Hillary Rodham Clinton, (Perennial, 1999), p. 147. See also: Christopher Anderson, Bill and Hillary: The Marriage, (William Morrow, 1999).

“It was an accepted fact that Hillary and Vince were sleeping with each other,” said Dr. Michael Galster, whose wife Vali was a close friend of Hillary’s. The couple mixed in the Clinton’s social circles. “Hillary and Vince’s love affair was an open secret.” —Edward Klein, The Truth about Hillary, (Sentinel, 2005), p. 21-22.

State Troopers Larry Patterson and Roger Perry related how Vince would show up at the Governor’s mansion in the evening like clockwork whenever Bill Clinton traveled. They also escorted Hillary and Vince to a remote cabin out in the woods. —David Brock, “Living with the Clintons: Bill’s Arkansas Bodyguards Tell the Story the Press Missed,” The American Spectator, Jan. 1994. See also: Christopher Anderson, Bill and Hillary: The Marriage, (William Morrow, 1999).

[2] “Death of Vince Foster: Parts 1- 4,” Accuracy in Media tape transcription of phone calls with Miguel Rodriguez, Oct. 16, 2004. The phone calls themselves are also available on CD.

[3] Miguel Rodriguez Memo, Dec. 9, 1994, “Meeting of Nov. 29, 1994 Concerning Foster Death Matter and Supplemental Investigation Prior to Grand Jury.” National Archives document, 102-506 (JFK Act), released Nov. 27, 2009. The memo itself is online at http://www.fbicover-up.com/ewExternalFiles/MiguelRodriguezMemo.pdf

[4] “the license plate was white out . . .” —Ambrose Evans-Pritchard, The Secret Life of Bill Clinton (Regnery Publishing, 1997), p. 165.

[5] “Death of Vince Foster: Parts 1- 4,” Accuracy in Media tape transcription of phone calls with Miguel Rodriguez, Oct. 16, 2004. The phone calls themselves are also available on CD.

[6] “Did he touch your genitals?” etc. —Ambrose Evans-Pritchard, The Secret Life of Bill Clinton (Regnery Publishing, 1997), p. 174.

[7] “Death of Vince Foster: Parts 1- 4,” Accuracy in Media tape transcription of phone calls with Miguel Rodriguez, Oct. 16, 2004. The phone calls themselves are also available on CD.

[8] Ibid

[9] Miguel Rodriguez Memo, Dec. 9, 1994, “Meeting of Nov. 29, 1994 Concerning Foster Death Matter and Supplemental Investigation Prior to Grand Jury.” National Archives document, 102-506 (JFK Act), released Nov. 27, 2009. The memo itself is online at http://www.fbicover-up.com/ewExternalFiles/MiguelRodriguezMemo.pdf

[10] Miguel Rodrigues letter to Kenneth W. Starr, Jan. 17, 1995. National Archives, 102-506 (JFK Act), released Dec. 16, 2009. See letter online at  http://www.fbicover-up.com/ewExternalFiles/Miquel%20resignation%20ltr.pdf

[11] “Death of Vince Foster: Parts 1- 4,” Accuracy in Media tape transcription of phone calls with Miguel Rodriguez, Oct. 16, 2004. The phone calls themselves are also available on CD.

[12] The full and technical name of the “Starr Report” is “The Report on the Death of Vincent W. Foster, Jr. by the Office of Independent Counsel in Re: Madison Guaranty Savings and Loan Association. The final 20 page Appendix by Patrick Knowlton can be viewed online at http://fbicover-up.com/ewExternalFiles/Purdue%20University%20Vol.2.pdf